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WtW Trees 1

Walking Through Winter

In my book I tell my personal story of loss which involved the loss of five babies through miscarriage and our first daughter Libby who died in labour at full term in 2012. With reference to my story, I address how winter seasons feel in our lives and the theological and existential questions that these seasons raise. From here, I move to discuss how we can, with God, ‘brave the elements’ of winter and walk with faith and authenticity through our seasons of loss. Using the Danish practice of hygge as a metaphor, I describe how we can create a rule of life for winter (hygge for the heartbroken), which will enable us not just to endure winter, but to experience God’s loving presence in the midst of the bleakest of winters. 

Whilst you can read Walking Through Winter all in one go; my hope is that you would then come back and take time in each chapter looking to apply the teaching and to read around the subject using the references I have given. More than this, I would love it if this book became a reference guide that you keep on your shelf to refer back to at different times in life.

The Press Release has a link to a sample chapter of my book. Why not try before you buy?

I recently recorded an interview over Zoom with my wonderful friend Jennie Frost. We unpacked some of the key themes in Walking Through Winter. Jennie has been releasing these videos on her Instagram feed (@jenjenfrost). To give you a taste of what’s in store have a watch of the short promo…

UCB radio1

As part of Baby Loss Awareness Week I chatted with Helen Price on UCB Radio 1 about my book and what we can do to support those going through the loss of a baby. You can catch up on our conversation here.

Premier ChristianityI am pleased to say that my book featured in the article Waiting for a miracle: Lessons in perseverance from Christians still praying for breakthrough by Claire Musters in the July 2021 edition of Premier Christianity. Read the complete piece HERE.

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WtW Trees 2
Stephen Cottrell

Walking through Winter is a timely and honest exploration of grief, suffering, lament and hope. Even if its theme is loss, it is brimming with life. Using the metaphor of the seasons, and drawing on costly personal experience and a wide range of resources, it is full of practical wisdom, authentic compassion and accessible theology.

Stephen Cottrell – Archbishop of York

Lucy Peppiatt

Katherine writes that she often describes the death of Libby, her baby daughter, as ‘something akin to a bomb going off’ in her life. This book charts the journey of how she learned to let God love her in and through pain and loss. It is a vulnerable, wise, authentic, and theologically enriched account of grief. Walking Through Winter is deeply moving and will speak to many, perhaps especially Christians who come from a world where grief, suffering, and pain are simply problems to be fixed. For anyone who has ever been told that, this book will come as a huge relief.

Lucy Peppiatt – Principal, WTC Theology

Paul Harcourt

Katherine’s story of loss is heart-breaking, but her description of what she’s learnt – and what can never be taken away – is profound and beautiful. These pages are full of comfort and wisdom for all who are facing their own winter and those who travel with them.

Paul Harcourt – National Leader of New Wine, England

Simon Ponsonby

St. Paul tells us that we comfort others with the comfort we ourselves have received from God. Katherine in her new book ‘Walking through Winter’, comforts us with the comfort she has received as she journeyed through personal Trauma and tragedy. It is a vulnerably honest, beautifully written, deeply considered, theologically grounded book that doesn’t seek to answer all our questions but shines the light of Jesus into our valley of shadows. I wholeheartedly recommend it for all who are journeying through pain or accompanying those who are.

Simon Ponsonby – Pastor of Theology, St. Aldates, Oxford

Endorsements

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WtW Trees 3

Foreword (excerpt):

In his Lament for a Son, Nicholas Wolterstorff writes of resisting the urge to act strong when faced with loss. “Wounds are ugly,” he acknowledges, but hastens to add this question, “But must they always be swathed?” There’s enormous pressure on those of us who are Christians to show that we’re different from the world, to be a witness, to display the joy of the LORD. These lofty aims often lead us to hide our wounds, our pain, and our sorrow. Everything from the songs we sing to the leaders we elevate can seem geared toward pain avoidance. In the process, our wounds fester and we suffer in silence. It doesn’t have to be this way. Wolterstorff continues with bold resolve. “I shall look at the world through tears. Perhaps I shall see things that dry-eyed I could not see.”

Katherine has chosen to see the world through tears. Walking Through Winter brings us through her story of suffering, lament (and eventually, hope) that accompanied the loss of her daughter Libby and five miscarriages. Her tears don’t distort reality. They bring it into sharp focus.

The insights in this book are cold-forged in Katherine’s own winter of suffering, and so it’s both deep and practical. As you journey through this book, and consider your own winter, I pray that Katherine’s words will minister to you as they have to so many of us.

In his Lament for a Son, Nicholas Wolterstorff writes of resisting the urge to act strong when faced with loss. “Wounds are ugly,” he acknowledges, but hastens to add this question, “But must they always be swathed?” There’s enormous pressure on those of us who are Christians to show that we’re different from the world, to be a witness, to display the joy of the LORD. These lofty aims often lead us to hide our wounds, our pain, and our sorrow. Everything from the songs we sing to the leaders we elevate can seem geared toward pain avoidance. In the process, our wounds fester and we suffer in silence. It doesn’t have to be this way. Wolterstorff continues with bold resolve. “I shall look at the world through tears. Perhaps I shall see things that dry-eyed I could not see.”

Katherine has chosen to see the world through tears. Walking Through Winter brings us through her story of suffering, lament (and eventually, hope) that accompanied the loss of her daughter Libby and five miscarriages. Her tears don’t distort reality. They bring it into sharp focus.

The insights in this book are cold-forged in Katherine’s own winter of suffering, and so it’s both deep and practical. As you journey through this book, and consider your own winter, I pray that Katherine’s words will minister to you as they have to so many of us.

Matt Lynch

Matthew Lynch – Assistant Professor of Old Testament at Regent College and co-founder of OnScript.

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WtW Trees 4
Katharine Hill

Walking Through Winter is a book forged in the crucible of a personal story of tragedy and loss. With an honest vulnerability Katherine invites us to join her as she journeys through winter. Full of theological insights, not dodging the difficult questions or giving easy answers, Katherine brings an inspirational message of courage and hope that will bring strength to anyone struggling to make sense of loss.

Katharine Hill – UK Director Care for the Family.

Brian Draper

We all encounter ‘winter’ in its many different forms – physical, spiritual, metaphorical, literal … – but far from avoiding or escaping the darker days, Katherine shows, instead, how to walk into them with courage, and to come through them, with transforming grace.
I, for one, am grateful.

Brian Draper – Author and contributor to BBC Radio 4’s Thought for the Day.

Bradley Jersak

The raw authenticity, the inexplicable courage, and the life of grace with which I watched Katherine walk through life’s great winter is expressed beautifully in this book. Without a doubt, readers have already or will inevitably face into their own unique icy windblast. Such is life. When you do, I commend Katherine and her memoirs as a seasoned and trustworthy guide. Invite her story onto your journey as she has invited you.

Bradley Jersak – Dean of Theology & Culture, St. Stephen’s University (New Brunswick)

Sheridan Voysey

Multiple miscarriages. A daughter lost in childbirth. Katherine Gantlett knows the blistering chill of life’s winter seasons. But by facing her heartbreak while never losing hope, she has journeyed through to spring and has gifts to share with us from the experience. Combining vulnerable storytelling and practical help with theological reflection, Walking Through Winter is indeed the ‘hygge for the heartbroken’ she wishes it to be – a book offering shelter and warmth for our own dark days.

Sheridan Voysey – Author and Contributor to Pause for Thought on BBC Radio 2

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Endorsements

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Trees05

Publisher

‘Walking Through Winter’ is published by Instant Apostle.

The Press Release has a link to a sample chapter. Why not try before you buy?

Winter trees artwork used with kind permission of Sam Thulin.

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